When the lights go out:
 what then, Greenpeace?

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when the lights go out

The other side of the ‘no fracking’ coin is, what are we going to do when the lights go out?

The green lobby has opposed every single attempt to insure ourselves against a future without power.

And what have they proposed to put in the place of everything they oppose?

Windmills.

All alternative power is more expensive and less productive than what we have now. For instance, in order to power California with wind farms, you’d have to move everyone out of Nevada and Arizona, flatten both states, and cover them with turbines. Does that sound like a good solution?

Meanwhile, all the money that has been so badly spent could have been invested in clean, renewable fuel sources that will benefit the entire planet. We’re nearly there – another 50 years, max, ten according to some optimists.

But the green lobby just wants to punish humanity because we’ve been bad according to their ethics. Which ignores the fact that the ‘bad’ we’ve done has brought us here. It’s brought us the means of transport and the means of communication that allows Greenpeace et al to plug in their computers, or fly off to the latest trouble spot, or use their smart phones to film villainous polluters and then flash the pictures all round the world.

A man from Greenpeace came to my office one day. I was editing a magazine and he thought we should be covering their efforts. This would have been about 1980. He was utterly mesmerising and convincing. I agreed on the spot to send one of my writers along that same weekend on assignment. Greenpeace were going up against some fishing boats because they believed fish stocks were being depleted to the point of extinction.

When I next saw my writer, he was shaking like a leaf, recovering from shock. “They nearly fucking killed me!” he said. What became clear was that far from feeling a responsibility to the guy I sent to help them get positive publicity, they had seen him as potential collateral damage that would play into their story of reckless environmental villains. Paying no attention whatever to his safety, they had come close to crushing him between their boat and one of the fishing boats they had targeted.

From then on, I saw every Greenpeace adventure from the point of view that they were fanatics who didn’t care for human beings at all. They were like adrenalin junkies, getting their fix from their most dangerous exploits.

when the lights go outEventually it became clear that if we lived according to the green lobby’s rules, we’d all still be tilling the land and hunting for food. Even Greenpeace co-founder Patrick Moore (right) has more recently walked away, referring to his former cohorts as ‘eco-fascists’. Last December he reported the charity to the FBI for a series of offences we would normally associate with The Mafia. Even more controversially, he’s joined the ranks of climate change sceptics.

Greenpeace, once on the cutting edge of environmental revolution, is now part of the international liberal-left establishment. It has joined ‘the green blob’ that seeks, King Canute-style, to turn back the tide of human evolution.

The ‘green blob’ is sucking hundreds of billions of dollars out of the world’s economy every year, oblivious to the fact that rampant unemployment and localised starvation are obvious consequences of their ‘all stick, no carrot’ policy.

But when the lights go out, what will they do for an encore? More to the point, what are they going to do when humankind eventually unveils a clean, renewable fuel source? We’ll all carry on flying, driving and powering up, guilt-free in terms of environmental damage, while they stand, transfixed in their fury and embarrassment.

Yes, Greenpeace. It could have been you. And all the other Green lobbies that keep telling us how bad we are. It could have been you that brought us solutions. Instead, you brought us problems, and then you created some more. And still you’d rather we didn’t look for gas in our own back yard. Frack off.

Patrick Moore reports Greenpeace to the FBI

Greenpeace co-founder joins climate change sceptics

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Paul has worked as a journalist, as a songwriter and producer, as a magazine publisher and partner in a design agency. Since leaving school aged 17 and spending three months doing hard manual labour as a gardener, all of his occupations have been sedentary.

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